lunes, 13 de abril de 2015

Should English be the official language of the EU?


http://ec.europa.eu/languages/policy/linguistic-diversity/official-languages-eu_en.htm

The European Union has 24 official and working languages. They are:
Bulgarian            
French
Maltese            
Croatian
German            
Polish
Czech
Greek
Portuguese
Danish
Hungarian
Romanian
Dutch
Irish
Slovak
English
Italian
Slovenian
Estonian
Latvian
Spanish
Finnish
Lithuanian
Swedish
The European Commission maintains the policy that all EU citizens have the right to access all EU documents in the official language(s) of the Commission, and should be able to write to the Commission and receive a response in their own language.

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/apr/24/europa-english-official-language-eu 

Translation in the EU's headquarters is a complicated – and often costly – business. The European commission has three official "procedural languages": German, French and English. But with the union expanding and 23 languages now spoken in member states, the number of translators has ballooned from 200-300 to 2,000-3,000. It is estimated that the EU produces 1.76m pages of translation work a year, costing €300m (£257m). As of 1 July, when Croatia joins the EU, there will be one more language to add to the pile.
In these austere times, national governments are eager to trim the EU budget, which is one reason why a recent speech by the German president was welcomed with such enthusiasm. In a keynote speech on the future of European integration in February, Joachim Gauck suggested English should become the EU's official language: "It is true to say that young people are growing up with English as the lingua franca. However, I feel that we should not simply let things take their course when it comes to linguistic integration." It was music to the ears of federalists and fiscal hawks: with English spoken in the corridors of Brussels, the EU would become more streamlined and more efficient.